BLOG: Employment Effects of Minimum Wage Increases – A Matched Pairs Design Using US Data

By Eric Karsten, Chong An Ong, Immanuel Adriana Rakshana, and Arushi Saksena, University of Chicago 

The minimum wage is a contentious issue, with proponents arguing that it is required to protect the wage security of low-income earners, and opponents arguing that it places downwards pressure on employment in the labor market. Our paper uses a differences in differences regression model, similar to the one used in Card & Krueger(1993) to estimate the unemployment effects of a minimum wage increase. Continue reading BLOG: Employment Effects of Minimum Wage Increases – A Matched Pairs Design Using US Data

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BLOG: Market Distorting Moral Hazard of Dodd-Frank’s Title II: The Costs of Inefficient Capital Markets

By Charles LeSueur, Vassar College

The purpose of this paper is to analyze whether Title II of the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank) effectively fulfills the stated goals of ending “too big to fail”, “no more taxpayer-funded bailouts”, and decreasing systemic risk.  I argue that Title II institutionalized taxpayer-funded bailouts under different language and increased systemic risk … Continue reading BLOG: Market Distorting Moral Hazard of Dodd-Frank’s Title II: The Costs of Inefficient Capital Markets

BLOG: Expert Opinion and Restaurant Pricing: Quantifying the Value of a Michelin Star

By Carly Shin, The George Washington University.

This paper investigates the relationship between expert ratings and the restaurant market. Specifically, this paper aims to broaden our understanding of the experience goods markets by looking at the effects of both having an expert-awarded Michelin star and earning or losing a Michelin star on New York City restaurant prices. Continue reading BLOG: Expert Opinion and Restaurant Pricing: Quantifying the Value of a Michelin Star

BLOG: Is Finance Making Geography Increasingly Insignificant?

By Yuxiang Hou, College of William and Mary

This paper attempts to revisit “the end of geography” debate by incorporating both established theoretical frameworks and the latest empirical evidence. It argues that for five reasons finance is not making geography increasingly insignificant. However, in the long run, things may be different. Continue reading BLOG: Is Finance Making Geography Increasingly Insignificant?

BLOG: To Stay or Migrate? Preferences and Occupational Choice in China’s Rural Ethnic Tourism Industry

By Virginia Zhang, New York University

Though rural workers in China now have more opportunities for rural-urban migration, they still face uncertainties in urban labor markets. For many rural Chinese ethnic minority workers, … Continue reading BLOG: To Stay or Migrate? Preferences and Occupational Choice in China’s Rural Ethnic Tourism Industry

BLOG: A Behavioral Econometric Assessment: Explaining Differential Electoral Turnout in the UK, across Different Ethnicities

By Amarvir Singh-Bal. Durham University

Although there are many ways to explain differential turnout in Britain, I suggest scholars should look more closely at the role of relative deprivation in… Continue reading BLOG: A Behavioral Econometric Assessment: Explaining Differential Electoral Turnout in the UK, across Different Ethnicities

BLOG: Are Immigrants Taking Our Jobs? An Economic Analysis of Immigrant Laborers in American Poultry Farms

By Jacob L. Peterson. Ball State University

Immigrants are taking American jobs, but we are all better off because of it. In today’s political environment, immigrants are viewed as a burden… Continue reading BLOG: Are Immigrants Taking Our Jobs? An Economic Analysis of Immigrant Laborers in American Poultry Farms