BLOG: One Solution to Two Problems: Solving Federal Debt and the Climate Problem through a Human-Oriented Carbon Tax

By Shreyansh Budhia, The George Washington University

Carbon taxes, or the taxation of greenhouse gas emissions, have been touted as a solution to rein in both climate change and the ballooning U.S. national debt. Carbon tax proposals also maintain many free market principles and have found support even among some fiscal conservatives. Continue reading BLOG: One Solution to Two Problems: Solving Federal Debt and the Climate Problem through a Human-Oriented Carbon Tax

BLOG: Three Gap Analysis of Macroeconomic Consistency: A Case Study of the Ecuadorian Economy

By Juan Andres Mesias, The George Washington University

This paper studies the macroeconomic consistency of the Ecuadorian economy from 2007- 2016. Initially, the paper develops a Three-Gap Model to carry out a basic consistency check on all three macroeconomic accounts, public, private and current accounts. Continue reading BLOG: Three Gap Analysis of Macroeconomic Consistency: A Case Study of the Ecuadorian Economy

BLOG: Northern Rock: The Forgotten Harbinger of the Global Financial Crisis

By Bishoy Megalla, Yale University

During the early days of 2007, Northern Rock stood as the fifth-largest bank in the United Kingdom by mortgage assets; with £113.5 billion in assets, the bank had grown tremendously from its origins in the twentieth century as a simple building society. Continue reading BLOG: Northern Rock: The Forgotten Harbinger of the Global Financial Crisis

BLOG: How Price and Non-Price Incentives Affect California Water Demand

By Christopher Deranian, University of Maryland, College Park

Over the past two decades, drought conditions in California have repeatedly threatened freshwater security in the state. Since Governor Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency in 2014, a variety of policies have been enacted to promote water conservation. Continue reading BLOG: How Price and Non-Price Incentives Affect California Water Demand

The Efficacy of State-Level PrEP Access Programs: A Tale of Two States

By Noah Zwiefel, Macalester College

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) reinvents what we know about HIV prevention by nearly eliminating the risk that an individual will seroconvert after exposure to HIV. Uptake, however, has been slow in many areas where it would be most beneficial. Continue reading The Efficacy of State-Level PrEP Access Programs: A Tale of Two States

Does Protest Turnout Affect Regulatory Policy?: Anti-Nuclear Energy Protests During the 1970s-90s

By James Sanders, Christopher Dann, Irene Kyoung, Rafae Qazi, Jintao Zhu, and Yihan Zhu, London School of Economics and Bowdoin College

Our research aims to quantify the impact of protest turnout on legislative change. Specifically, we formulate a two-period model to explain the behaviour of legislators when faced with a variety of protest turnouts and preferences of the median voter. Continue reading Does Protest Turnout Affect Regulatory Policy?: Anti-Nuclear Energy Protests During the 1970s-90s