The Economic Impact of Psychological Distress on Former Child Soldiers

By Jonathan Kaufmann, American University

While previous research demonstrates a significant negative relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder and earnings among adult veterans in the United States, a similar connection for children in developing nations has not been established. The literature indicates that both endogeneity and sample-selection biases are inherent in this relationship. This paper used Continue reading The Economic Impact of Psychological Distress on Former Child Soldiers

BLOG: Market Distorting Moral Hazard of Dodd-Frank’s Title II: The Costs of Inefficient Capital Markets

By Charles LeSueur, Vassar College

The purpose of this paper is to analyze whether Title II of the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank) effectively fulfills the stated goals of ending “too big to fail”, “no more taxpayer-funded bailouts”, and decreasing systemic risk.  I argue that Title II institutionalized taxpayer-funded bailouts under different language and increased systemic risk … Continue reading BLOG: Market Distorting Moral Hazard of Dodd-Frank’s Title II: The Costs of Inefficient Capital Markets

BLOG: Expert Opinion and Restaurant Pricing: Quantifying the Value of a Michelin Star

By Carly Shin, The George Washington University.

This paper investigates the relationship between expert ratings and the restaurant market. Specifically, this paper aims to broaden our understanding of the experience goods markets by looking at the effects of both having an expert-awarded Michelin star and earning or losing a Michelin star on New York City restaurant prices. Continue reading BLOG: Expert Opinion and Restaurant Pricing: Quantifying the Value of a Michelin Star

BLOG: Is Finance Making Geography Increasingly Insignificant?

By Yuxiang Hou, College of William and Mary

This paper attempts to revisit “the end of geography” debate by incorporating both established theoretical frameworks and the latest empirical evidence. It argues that for five reasons finance is not making geography increasingly insignificant. However, in the long run, things may be different. Continue reading BLOG: Is Finance Making Geography Increasingly Insignificant?

BLOG: To Stay or Migrate? Preferences and Occupational Choice in China’s Rural Ethnic Tourism Industry

By Virginia Zhang, New York University

Though rural workers in China now have more opportunities for rural-urban migration, they still face uncertainties in urban labor markets. For many rural Chinese ethnic minority workers, … Continue reading BLOG: To Stay or Migrate? Preferences and Occupational Choice in China’s Rural Ethnic Tourism Industry

Our Winter 2017-18 Issue

On behalf of the Comparative Advantage Editorial Board, I am honored to present the fifth volume, Winter Issue of the Stanford Undergraduate Economics Journal. We have continued our mission of making economic research more accessible to all audiences. To provide content more frequently to readers, we have moved to publishing two issues per year, mirroring our two-round submission process. Our blog has also become a … Continue reading Our Winter 2017-18 Issue